Ford snaps up Michigan Central Station!

Hell yes. As Robin Runyan has mentioned below, it is indeed a good day for Detroit. Ford has snagged two long derelict Cork Town properties, and the possibilities have many looking forward to their plans.  As many of you know, I love Detroit. I am excited to see whats in store for these iconic spots!

Report: Michigan Central Station has a new owner

It’s a good day for Detroit

Photo by Michelle & Chris Gerard

We’re getting closer to a likely announcement from Ford in mid-June, as the auto company looks to be creating a campus in Detroit. Crain’s first reported that long-time train depot owners the Morouns have transferred ownership of the long-vacant train station to a New York law firm.

The article states, “A warranty deed dated May 22 was recorded May 23 by the Wayne County Register of Deeds, transferring ownership from the Moroun-owned MCS Crown Land Development Co. LLC to New Investment Properties I LLC.”

The nearby Detroit Public Schools book depository building also transferred ownership to a (slightly) different entity—New Investment Properties II LLC.

The entities aren’t clearly identified as Ford, and the company isn’t specifically addressing it at this point. Dawn Booker from Ford’s real estate division told Crain’s, “We are very excited about our return to Detroit this year beginning with our electric vehicle and autonomous vehicle teams relocating to the historic former factory in Corktown. We expect to grow our presence in Detroit and will share more details in the future.”

This comes after months of speculation and increasingly backed-up rumors of Ford Motor Company buying and renovating Michigan Central Station. Many reports in the past few months have linked Ford to properties around Corktown, including vacant parcels and buildingsEdsel Ford II also confirmed to Crain’s that Ford was discussing a potential move into Corktown.

Ford recently moved over 200 employees working on autonomous vehicle technologies into a refurbished building in Corktown.

Last year, we took a look back at the beauty of Michigan Central Station in historic photos. We can’t wait to see the building—long thought of as a symbol of Detroit’s decline—back in use again.

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